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Edinburgh Book Festival Review – Jacqueline Wilson

August 14, 2007

Jacqueline WilsonWith over 90 books and over 20 million book sales in the UK alone, and having had her work translated into stage plays, TV series and spin-offs, Jacqueline Wilson is a publishing phenomenon.

Her ability to enthral younger audiences through the written word is as remarkable as the silence that befell the RBS Main Stage on Saturday 11th August, the first day of the Edinburgh International Book Festival, as hundreds of kids aged from five to fifteen, sat and listened intently, hanging on this remarkable author’s every word.

Best known for her series of books about child tearaway, Tracy Beaker, Wilson she has had a life in publishing that spans back over four decades. She began writing at the age of nine, and it was her defiance of her parent’s beliefs that writing was a follie career choice, that saw her accept a job with Dundee-based DC Thompson’s when still a teenager. They had realised the money they could save by swapping paying her royalties for her work, in place of a regular wage, and so she left her home town of Bath for the east coast of Scotland.

From a cupboard under the stairs in an all-girls hostel, Wilson began her apprenticeship, and within a couple of years she had made a huge an impact with her writing talent and boundless imagination. A popular teen magazine named Jackie, was one such product she worked on, and indeed the magazine was itself named in her honour. Only the heads of the parents in the audience could be seen nodding in recognition at the mention of that particular magazine.

Soon the novels were pouring out of her, and it is here at the Edinburgh Book Festival that she reveals the title of her new autobiography, Jacky Daydreams, was inspired by the name one her more vicious primary school teachers gave her. She didn’t deny it, of course, but some of the other abuse she recalled from the same person would land any teacher in the land a prison sentence, were it still the norm in today’s classrooms.

Wilson was also recognised in 2005 for her work with children, actively encouraging new readers and literacy when she was appointed as Children’s Laureate and an OBE for services to literature. Looking much younger than her years, Wilson dressed in black with silver hair and jewellery looks and sounds as though she intends to carry on for a long time yet. And it’s the readers of the UK that will benefit, and very soon the US too as she embarks on her first major tour of the States.

Like Tracy Beaker herself, nobody is going to tell Jacqueline Wilson when it’s time to stop.

Related Links
www.randomhouse.co.uk/childrens/jacquelinewilson/home.htm
www.edbookfest.co.uk

~ Colin Galbraith ~
www.colingalbraith.co.uk

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4 comments

  1. […] For more on these writers and the Edinburgh Book Festival, tune in to The Scruffy Dog Review Blog where I am writing a series of reviews on all the events I am attending. Already published is a review of Saturday’s event with Jacqueline Wilson, which you can read by clicking here. […]


  2. […] my evening writing up the outstanding reviews for all the events I’ve been to so far. With the Jacqueline Wilson already published as part of Tuesday’s regular weekly article, tonight I wrote and published last […]


  3. […] Jacqueline Wilson (Aug 11th) […]


  4. I LOVE YOUR BOOKS EXPESSALY SECRETS AND GIRLS UNDER PRESSURE.
    XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX
    CONNIE;-)



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